Mythos 42 – Rama and Ra

 

Rama (Ram) and Ra (Re) had a great deal in common besides a similar name. Both gods were involved in a war that spanned three worlds. In Egypt, Ra was believed to rule the three worlds: the Sky, the Earth, and the Duat.(1)George Hart (2005) The Routledge Dictionary of Egyptian Gods and Goddesses In the Rāmāyaṇa Ravana became known as the Emperor of the Three Worlds after making an agreement with the Nivatakavachas and Kalakeyas. The Nivatakavachas were a celestial race of Asura, that lived in oceans. Their name is Sanskrit translated as approximately ‘no-air-garment.’ The Kalakeyas were another group of amphibious beings, who hid themselves in the sea during the day time, and come out at night to terrorize humans. The Kalakeyas also protected one of the great vimana cities that circled in the sky: the city called Hiranyapura.(2)Mahābhārata, Volume 2: Book 2: The Book of Assembly; Book 3: The Book of the Forest By J. A. Van Buitenen In the Mahābhārata, Indra approached Vishnu and requested him to help them. Vishnu replied:

“Kalakeyas are more powerful and stronger than all of you. Besides that, they are in the sea. It is very difficult to kill them. If all the water in the sea is drained out, we can kill them.” Therefore, you should approach Saint Agastya and seek his help” said Lord Vishnu.

Agastya drank all of the water in the sea until it became dry. All the Kalakeyas who are hiding in the sea came out. Devatas fought with them and killed them. Those who escaped fled underground. The only problem now was refilling the sea.- Mahābhārata (3)Mahabharat, Aranya Parva, Third Chapter by Om Tatsat

A Relief Carving of Bes at Dendera

A Relief Carving of Bes at Dendera

Agastya was an ancient dwarven sage, whose name translates in Sanskrit as ‘mountain-thrower,’ and in Tamil, a modern Dravidian language as ‘inside-the-house.’(4)Monier Monier-Williams (1899) A Sanskrit-English Dictionary: Etymologically and Philologically Arranged with Special Reference to Cognate Indo-European languages A similar god called Bes, Bisu, or Aha, was worshiped in Egypt from the Pre-Dynastic Era. The earliest references to Bes called him Aha, meaning ‘fighter.’ Like Agastya, Bes was a protector god, represented as a bearded dwarf. Agastya is also the Indian astronomical name of the star of Canopus,(5)David Frawley (1993) Gods, Sages and Kings: Vedic Secrets of Ancient Civilization which is an F-Type star(6)A. Domiciano De Souza, et al. (2008) “Diameter and photospheric structures of Canopus from AMBER/VLTI interferometry,” Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 489 Number 2, Pages L5–L8 somewhat brighter than the Sun, estimated to be around 309 light years away.(7)F. van Leeuwen (2007) “Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction,” Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 474, Number 2, Pages 653–664 Agastya’s hermitage in the time of the Rāmāyaṇa was already sunken in the region beyond the Malaya Mountains, where many islands were sunken or sinking. Given the translation of his name, and the description of a meteor storm before the sinking of Dvārakā, it seems to imply that Agastya caused a meteor storm that caused a tsunami exposing the floor of the ocean in the regions along the coast of India.

References   [ + ]

1. George Hart (2005) The Routledge Dictionary of Egyptian Gods and Goddesses
2. Mahābhārata, Volume 2: Book 2: The Book of Assembly; Book 3: The Book of the Forest By J. A. Van Buitenen
3. Mahabharat, Aranya Parva, Third Chapter by Om Tatsat
4. Monier Monier-Williams (1899) A Sanskrit-English Dictionary: Etymologically and Philologically Arranged with Special Reference to Cognate Indo-European languages
5. David Frawley (1993) Gods, Sages and Kings: Vedic Secrets of Ancient Civilization
6. A. Domiciano De Souza, et al. (2008) “Diameter and photospheric structures of Canopus from AMBER/VLTI interferometry,” Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 489 Number 2, Pages L5–L8
7. F. van Leeuwen (2007) “Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction,” Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 474, Number 2, Pages 653–664