Mythos 44 – Garuda and Horus

 

King Ramses 2 Before the Theban Triad

King Ramses 2 Before the Theban Triad

The iconic similarities between Ra and Rama, Bes and Agastya, Babi and Hanumān, and Anubis and Jambavan are startling, as is the similarity between the iconography of the Theban Triad and the Hindu Puri Triad. In ancient Egypt the Theban Triad was composed of the dark skinned Amun, the light skinned Khonsu, and the yellow skinned Mut. The Indian the Puri Triad was composed of the dark skinned Krishna, the light skinned Balaram, and the yellow skinned Subhadra. Amun and Krishna were both generally depicted as either black or blue skinned, with a sacred river flowing from their toes, and with two large feathers in their head-dress. Amun was first mentioned in the Old Egyptian pyramid texts(1)Kurt Sethe (1908) Die altaegyptischen pyramidentexte nach den papier-abdrücken und photographien des Berliner museums neu hrsg. und erläutert, Number 446 circa 4,400 to 4,300 years ago. He rose to the position of tutelary deity of Thebes after the end of the First Intermediate Period or dark age, under the 11th dynasty circa 4,100 years ago.

Hindu Dolls of the Puri Triad

Hindu Dolls of the Puri Triad

After the rebellion of Thebes against the Hyksos and during the rule of Ahmose I, Amun acquired national importance, expressed in his fusion with Ra, as Amun-Ra. Amun-Ra retained chief importance in the Egyptian pantheon throughout the New Kingdom, circa 3,600 to 3,100 years ago, when he held the position of transcendental, self-created creator deity par excellence.(2)Michael Brennan Dick (1999) Born in heaven, made on earth: the making of the cult image in the ancient Near East Amun-Ra was the champion of the poor or troubled and central to personal piety.(3)Vincent Arieh Tobin (2003) Oxford Guide: The Essential Guide to Egyptian Mythology, Page 20 His position as King of Gods developed to the point of virtual monotheism where other gods became manifestations of him. This is very similar to the view some Hindus hold of Vishnu, or Siva. Krishna and Rama were both considered to be incarnations of Vishnu by Vaishnavites, or incarnations of Shiva by Shaivites. Among these two major branches of Hinduism either Vishnu or Shiva is considered to be the supreme God-Head, and all other gods are simply incarnations or aspects of him.

Traditional Hindu Representation of Garuda

Traditional Hindu Representation of Garuda

Both the Egyptian and pre-Vedic Hindu beliefs also have other odd iconography in common, such as Horus and Garuda. Horus is one of the oldest and most significant deities in ancient Egyptian religion, who was worshiped from the Pre-Dynastic period until Roman times. He was most often depicted as a falcon, or as a man with a falcon head.(4)Richard H. Wilkinson (2003) The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt, Page 202 Horus is recorded in Egyptian hieroglyphs as ḥr.w; the pronunciation has been reconstructed as *Ḥāru, meaning falcon. A falcon likely representing Horus is on the Narmer Palette dating from about the 5,100 years ago. Garuda is a large bird-like creature, or bird-man that appears in both Hinduism and Buddhism. Garuda does not appear to be a Sanskrit word, and is not found in the Vedas, where a similar creature called Śyena is found. Śyena is the Sanskrit word for eagle. The name Garuda is believed to be based on the old Dravidian word kaṛug-u meaning ‘eagle.'(5)Robert Caldwell (1996) A Comparative Grammar of the Dravidian Or South-Indian Family of Languages, Third Edition, Page 591 Whatever this bird-man was, he is found in the oldest religions, from Egypt to India to northern Eurasia.

References   [ + ]

1. Kurt Sethe (1908) Die altaegyptischen pyramidentexte nach den papier-abdrücken und photographien des Berliner museums neu hrsg. und erläutert, Number 446
2. Michael Brennan Dick (1999) Born in heaven, made on earth: the making of the cult image in the ancient Near East
3. Vincent Arieh Tobin (2003) Oxford Guide: The Essential Guide to Egyptian Mythology, Page 20
4. Richard H. Wilkinson (2003) The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt, Page 202
5. Robert Caldwell (1996) A Comparative Grammar of the Dravidian Or South-Indian Family of Languages, Third Edition, Page 591