Mythos 59 – Eurasian Runiform

 

Comparison of Nordic Futhark and Eurasian Runiform (Göktürk Orkhon)

Comparison of Nordic Futhark and Eurasian Runiform (Göktürk Orkhon)

Throughout the entire region of Cimmerian influence, from Europe to Siberia, and across the Eurasian Steppes, a similar looking script was adapted and adopted by successive civilizations for several millennia. This script is often called Eurasian Runiform, because the later scripts looked like the Futhark script of northern Europe, that was still known when European archaeologists first started uncovering older versions of the script. The Germanic version called the Futhark, dates back to around 2,100 years ago,(1)Eric Moltke (1976) Runerne i Danmark og deres oprindelse and is believed to be based on the older Etruscan script.(2)Jost Gippert (2001) The Development of Old Germanic Alphabets The Etruscan alphabet was used since at least 2,700 years ago, and is believed to have been developed from a western Greek alphabet. The Old Latin alphabet is also believed to have been developed from a western Greek alphabet. The Greek alphabet has been in use since at least 2,800 years ago,(3)B. F. Cook (1987) Greek inscriptions, Page 9 and is believed to have been derived from the earlier Phoenician alphabet. The Phoenician alphabet was in use at least 3,200 years ago,(4)Florian Coulmas (1989) Writing Systems of the World and is the oldest verified consonantal alphabet, or abjad.(5)Steven Roger Fischer (2004) A history of writing, Page 90

A Tablet Using Linear B Script From Circa 3,200 Years Ago.

A Tablet Using Linear B Script From Circa 3,200 Years Ago.

Prior to developing the Greek alphabet, the Greek used the Linear-B alphabet, since at least 3,450 years ago,(6)“New Linear B tablet found at Iklaina,” Comité International Permanent des Études Mycéniennes, UNESCO. which they had learnt from the Minoans. The Minoans were the original inhabitants of the island of Crete, before the Greeks colonized it, which the Greeks called Eteocretans, meaning ‘true Cretans,’ having a similar connotation to the modern English terms ‘Native American,’ or ‘Australian Aborigine.’ The Minoans are a somewhat mysterious civilization that rose and fell in the Aegean before the time of the Greeks. There have been many attempts to decipher their language, however at this time many linguists seem to believe it was an Indo-European language, closely related to Sanskrit,(7)Hubert La Marle, (2006) Linéaire A, la première écriture syllabique de Crète and with close connections to Armenian and Hittite.(8)Garth Owens (Feb 1, 2006) “The Language of the Minoans” Crete Gazette The Minoans wrote in an earlier version of the Linear script, called Linear-A, as well as in Cretan Hieroglyphs, since at least 4,700 years ago.(9)Paul Wheatley (2008) The Origins and Character of the Ancient Chinese City, Volume 2: The Chinese City in Comparative Perspective, Page 403 The Linear script was used widely throughout the eastern Mediterranean, with Linear relics discovered in Greece, Cyprus, Turkey, Lebanon, Israel, Egypt, and Bulgaria. Some linguists believe that the Phoenicians were writing in a version of Linear before developing the Phoenician Alphabet.(10)Manfried Dietrich and Oswald Loretz, editors (2001) Ugarit-Forschungen, Band 32: Internationales Jahrbuch fur die Altertumskunde Syrien-Palastinas The Cretan Hieroglyphs are believed to have been related to the Hittite Hieroglyphs, used by the neighboring Indo-European civilization in modern Turkey. All of these scripts and hieroglyphs show a continuation of a literary tradition within the Indo-European, and especially Indo-Iranian cultures, going back to at least 4,700 years. However, if the Arctic homeland theory is true, the Indo-European people should have a much older written tradition.

Ancient Tablets Using Vinča Symbols From Circa 7,000 Years Ago

Ancient Tablets Using Vinča Symbols From Circa 7,000 Years Ago

There is a much older script known to have existed in a region where the Aryans seem to have resided: the Danube. This older script is referred to as the Vinča symbols, as it has yet to be deciphered. Like the later Minoan Linear-A and Hieroglyphs it appears to be a set of symbols that combines both simple linear runic symbols, and simple drawings called glyphs. These are used inter-changeably throughout the 700 artifacts discovered to date using the script, much like the Minoan use of Linear-A with Hieroglyphs, or the ancient Egyptian use of Hieratic with Hieroglyphs, or the modern Japanese use of Kana with Kanji. Little is known of the civilization that used the Vinča symbols; the name Vinča is taken from one of the towns they were first found in. The symbols have been found on clay tablets 7,300 to 6,000 years old,(11)Harald Haarmann (2002) Geschichte der Schrift, Page 20 are found in various archaeological sites throughout south-eastern Europe, notably in Serbia, Hungary, Romania,(12)Marco Merlini and Gheorghe Lazarovici (2008) “Settling discovery circumstances, dating and utilization of the Tărtăria tablets,” Acta Terrae Septemcastrensis, Volume VII, Page 111 Bulgaria, Greece,(13)G. H. Hourmouziadis, editor (2002), Dispilio, 7500 Years After Moldova, and the Ukraine.

References   [ + ]

1. Eric Moltke (1976) Runerne i Danmark og deres oprindelse
2. Jost Gippert (2001) The Development of Old Germanic Alphabets
3. B. F. Cook (1987) Greek inscriptions, Page 9
4. Florian Coulmas (1989) Writing Systems of the World
5. Steven Roger Fischer (2004) A history of writing, Page 90
6. “New Linear B tablet found at Iklaina,” Comité International Permanent des Études Mycéniennes, UNESCO.
7. Hubert La Marle, (2006) Linéaire A, la première écriture syllabique de Crète
8. Garth Owens (Feb 1, 2006) “The Language of the Minoans” Crete Gazette
9. Paul Wheatley (2008) The Origins and Character of the Ancient Chinese City, Volume 2: The Chinese City in Comparative Perspective, Page 403
10. Manfried Dietrich and Oswald Loretz, editors (2001) Ugarit-Forschungen, Band 32: Internationales Jahrbuch fur die Altertumskunde Syrien-Palastinas
11. Harald Haarmann (2002) Geschichte der Schrift, Page 20
12. Marco Merlini and Gheorghe Lazarovici (2008) “Settling discovery circumstances, dating and utilization of the Tărtăria tablets,” Acta Terrae Septemcastrensis, Volume VII, Page 111
13. G. H. Hourmouziadis, editor (2002), Dispilio, 7500 Years After