Mythos 61 – Fennoscandian Airyana Vaejo

 

Whether the Vedic description of Amaravati is the description of a space station or not, the Dānu River was not the homeland of the Aryan people. The homeland of the Aryans was the Airyana Vaejo, which they had migrated from after the last ice-age according to the theory of Tilak. This homeland would have been a large island bordering the Arctic Circle sometime between 130,000 and 115,000 years ago. This island would have logically been Fennoscandia which was an island during the interglacial period. Fennoscandia is the northern most part of Europe, including modern Norway, Sweden, Finland, the Russian Republic of Karelia, and the Oblast of Murmansk. During the warm interglacial period the icecaps in the Arctic had mostly melted, and the southern icecap had reseeded causing the mean ocean level to rise, flooding the low laying regions of northwest Russia between Arkhangelsk and St. Petersburg. At the time Denmark and most of northern Germany and Poland, as well as the Baltic coast was also flooded, making Fennoscandia much more isolated than it is today.

Fennoscandia During the Previous Inter-glacial Period Circa 110,000 Years Ago

Fennoscandia During the Previous Interglacial Period Circa 115,000 Years Ago

Placing the Airyana Vaejo in Fennoscandia between 130,000 and 115,000 years ago does create some problems archaeologically. First as the region was ground under by 100,000 years of glaciers several kilometers deep, nothing artificial from before the glaciation should have survived, including any cities that may have existed. The second problem is that there is currently no evidence of homosapiens or neanderthals in the area prior to the last glaciation. If the story in the Avesta of the Airyana Vaejo from the valleys to the mountaintops being covered in ice during the terrible winter that caused the Aryans to leave the Airyana Vaejo, is the story of the onset of the last glacial period covering Fennoscandia in kilometer deep glaciers, then this story has been preserved for over 110,000 years, which seems impossible without some sort of writing. The story itself though does indicate that the Aryans were a highly advanced culture, even by modern standards. In the Avestan book Vendidad as the Airyana Vaejo was being destroyed, the shepherd King Yima built an underground bunker called the Vara, meaning enclosure. The Vara was a multi-level artificially lit bunker 3 kilometres (2 miles) long and 3 kilometres (2 miles) wide:

And Ahura Mazda spake unto Yima, saying: ‘O fair Yima, son of Vivanghat! Upon the material world the evil winters are about to fall, that shall bring the fierce, deadly frost; upon the material world the evil winters are about to fall, that shall make snow-flakes fall thick, even an aredvi deep on the highest tops of mountains.

‘And the beasts that live in the wilderness, and those that live on the tops of the mountains, and those that live in the bosom of the dale shall take shelter in underground abodes.

‘Before that winter, the country would bear plenty of grass for cattle, before the waters had flooded it. Now after the melting of the snow, O Yima, a place wherein the footprint of a sheep may be seen will be a wonder in the world.

‘Therefore make thee a Vara, long as a riding-ground on every side of the square, and thither bring the seeds of sheep and oxen, of men, of dogs, of birds, and of red blazing fires. Therefore make thee a Vara, long as a riding-ground on every side of the square, to be an abode for man; a Vara, long as a riding-ground on every side of the square, for oxen and sheep.

‘There thou shalt make waters flow in a bed a hathra long; there thou shalt settle birds, on the green that never fades, with food that never fails. There thou shalt establish dwelling-places, consisting of a house with a balcony, a courtyard, and as gallery.

‘Thither thou shalt bring the seeds of men and women, of the greatest, best, and finest on this Earth; thither thou shalt bring the seeds of every kind of cattle, of the greatest, best, and finest on this Earth.

‘Thither thou shalt bring the seeds of every kind of tree, of the highest of size and sweetest of odour on this Earth; thither thou shalt bring the seeds of every kind of fruit, the best of savour and sweetest of odour. All those seeds shalt thou bring, two of every kind, to be kept inexhaustible there, so long as those men shall stay in the Vara.

‘There shall be no humpbacked, none bulged forward there; no impotent, no lunatic; no malicious, no liar; no one spiteful, none jealous; no one with decayed tooth, no leprous to be pent up, nor any of the brands wherewith Angra Mainyu stamps the bodies of mortals.

‘In the largest part of the place thou shalt make nine streets, six in the middle part, three in the smallest. To the streets of the largest part thou shalt bring a thousand seeds of men and women; to the streets of the middle part, six hundred; to the streets of the smallest part, three hundred. That Vara thou shalt seal up with thy golden seal, and thou shalt make a door, and a window self-shining within.- Avesta (1)Avesta, Fargard 2.22-30, Translated by James Darmesteter in 1898

References   [ + ]

1. Avesta, Fargard 2.22-30, Translated by James Darmesteter in 1898