Mythos 76 – Poseidon and Apam Napat

 

Female warriors and leaders among Imazighen are well documented in the historic era, the most famous likely being Queen Tin Hinan. This warrior queen lived in the late Roman Era, and ruled the Hoggar Region of southern Algeria. Her tomb was opened by Byron Khun de Prorok in 1925, and subsequent carbon dating has placed the life of this Queen to approximately 1,600 to 1,700 years ago (circa 300 to 400 AD).(1)Michael Brett and Elizabeth Fentress (1997) The Berbers Queen Tin Hinan is seen as the cultural matriarch of the Tuareg people of the Central Sahara, which are a southern branch of the Imazighen people. Unlike the Imazighen of the Atlas Mountains the Tuareg are a multi-ethnic people, including both light skinned and dark skinned members. This correlates with the ancient Libyan mythos recorded by Diodorus, in which the home marshland of the Amazons was inhabited by both light skinned Amazons and Atlanians, as well as dark skinned Ethiopians.

Ancient Cave Painting from Tassili n'Ajjer in Southern Algeria Depicting Creatures Resembling the Egyptian Set

Ancient Cave Painting from Tassili n’Ajjer in Southern Algeria, depicting creatures that look like Set or Enusha

The story of ancient female warriors is also painted on the mountains of the Sahara, with rock painting of females wielding spears documented in Tassili n’Ajjer, southwest Algeria. The region contains thousands of ancient paintings and carvings depicting the Sahara as a moist land, home to crocodiles, elephants, giraffes, and gazelle. This is consistent with what has been discovered about the climate of the Sahara between 14,500 to 8,000 years ago, and again between 6,600 and 4,700 years ago.(2)William J. Burroughs (2007) Climate Change in Prehistory: the end of the reign of chaos The rock painting and carvings also depict strange creatures that are unknown on the Earth, mostly upright walking like humans. Some of these creatures are remarkably similar to creatures recorded in the mytho-history of ancient cultures whose records are still understood, such as the Egyptian Set. While there is no known proof of an Amazon or Atlantean invasion of Europe or Western Asia, the Imazighen people do share a recent Mitochondrial-DNA linkage with the Saami people of Northern Europe. The Saami of northern Europe and the Imazighen of North Africa were found to share an extremely young branch of haplogroup U mitochrondrial-DNA; indicating these two people were the same people around 9,000 years ago.(3)Alessandro Achilli, et al. (2005) “Saami and Berbers – An Unexpected Mitochondrial DNA Link,” The American Society of Human Genetics, Volume 76, Number 5, Pages 883–886 Like the Imazighen the Saami have been documented as having a matriarchal society in pre-Christian times. This supports the account by Diodorus that a Libyan army once traveled to the region north of the Black Sea.

Ancient Cave Paintings of Strange Gorgon-like Creatures in  Tassili n'Ajjer, Southern Algeria

Ancient Cave Painting of a Human Running From Strange Gorgon-like Creatures in Tassili n’Ajjer, Southern Algeria

In Plato’s account, the Atlantean civilization was founded by the god Poseidon, who seems to have been the chief god of the Mycenaean Greeks circa 3,500 years ago. His name appears commonly in the Mycenaean Linear-B script as ???? (Po-se-da-o),(4)Martin Nilsson (1967) Die Geschichte der Griechische Religion, Page 444 and like the later Greeks, the Mycenaeans called Poseidon the earth-shaker. His name meaning Lord-of-the-Earth (πόσις δᾶ),(5)Pierre Chantraine (1974) Dictionnaire etymologique de la langue grecque was identical to the Sumerian god Enki (??). While Poseidon is similar to the Aryan god Apam Napat (अपाम नपात, اپام نپات) the existence of a different name for him in the Aegean indicates that he was likely worshiped by the Pelagians,(6)R. S. P. Beekes (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Greek, Page 324 before the Proto-Greeks migrated into the region circa 6,000 years ago.(7)Russel D. Gray and Quentin D. Atkinson (2003) “Language-tree Divergence Times Support the Anatolian Theory of Indo-European Origin,” Nature, Volume 426, Number 6965, Pages 435–439 The Celts and Romans to the west of the Greeks worshiped Apam Napat under the names Neptunus and Nechtan which are believed to be derived from the same root as Apam Napat.(8)G. Dumézil (1975) Fêtes romaines d’ étè et d’ automne, suivi par dix questions romaines, Page 25 Like Enki, he is described an aquatic god, that taught the basic aspects of civilization to primitive people.

The stories of Poseidon and Enki also both include the odd tale of the indigenous peoples of the Earth being altered into modern humans by the “Lords-of-the-Earth” in order to become more civilized and to obey them. In the case of the Sumerians the indigenous people of the Earth were called the Nungalene, while in the case of the Greeks they were called the Autochthones. The Sumerian mythos held that the Anunna made the humans from the Nungalene because the Nungalene refused to work for them. In the Greek myth of Atlantis, Poseidon found Autochthones living in Atlantis and interbred with one of them called Cleito,(9)Plato (circa 350 BC) Critias, 114c creating a new better civilized race of demigods which included Atlas, the first King of the Imazighen (Atlanteans).

References   [ + ]

1. Michael Brett and Elizabeth Fentress (1997) The Berbers
2. William J. Burroughs (2007) Climate Change in Prehistory: the end of the reign of chaos
3. Alessandro Achilli, et al. (2005) “Saami and Berbers – An Unexpected Mitochondrial DNA Link,” The American Society of Human Genetics, Volume 76, Number 5, Pages 883–886
4. Martin Nilsson (1967) Die Geschichte der Griechische Religion, Page 444
5. Pierre Chantraine (1974) Dictionnaire etymologique de la langue grecque
6. R. S. P. Beekes (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Greek, Page 324
7. Russel D. Gray and Quentin D. Atkinson (2003) “Language-tree Divergence Times Support the Anatolian Theory of Indo-European Origin,” Nature, Volume 426, Number 6965, Pages 435–439
8. G. Dumézil (1975) Fêtes romaines d’ étè et d’ automne, suivi par dix questions romaines, Page 25
9. Plato (circa 350 BC) Critias, 114c